History

Gaelic Football and Hurling has been played in the Pacific Northwest since the 1920s. In the early years, it was usually in the form of pick-up games at the annual Irish Club picnic. However, in the late 1950s, the game became better organized in the Northwest, team jerseys were purchased and challenge games were organized against teams from Vancouver, BC, and even against San Francisco teams. These Seattle area teams were composed of a few young Irish-born priests, other Irish-born people living in the Seattle/Tacoma area.

Contacts were made in 1959 with the newly formed North American County Board (NACB) with a view towards affiliating with the GAA, but those efforts came to naught, and in the late 1960s, Gaelic Football and Hurling basically became dormant in the Seattle/Tacoma area. In 1980, a Tacoma team was organized by Tom Quinlan and John Duggan and they joined with Seattle and Vancouver to form the Northwest Division of the NACB. The Tacoma Evergreen Irish won the Northwest Championship in 1981 beating Seattle and Vancouver BC.

The Northwest Division League was later expanded to include teams from as far away as Calgary and Edmonton. However, the Tacoma team folded after several very successful years, including one year when they lost to San Francisco in a Playoff game played in Tacoma.

In 2012, Hud Wilkins, a former player with the Corvallis Hurling team in Oregon, moved to Tacoma and established a Hurling Team here. Fred Dunne, a Dublin native, was one of the first to sign up to this new team. Others such as Rory O Flaherty, Michael Gould and Sean Davis soon joined and players participated in games in Seattle and Portland. It was decided in 2013 to expand the club into Gaelic Football. Tom Lagan, a former player and Secretary of the Seattle Gaels, joined the club and at the inaugural meeting, in July 2013, a club committee was established.

In early 2013, the Tacoma News Tribune came out to a scrimmage between the Rangers and The Seattle Gaels and put together a feature on Gaelic Sports in Tacoma.